How EPIFLO Works

Convenience combined with wound healing for a better patient experience. Stay mobile, experience continuous treatment, and benefit from the safe, therapeutic effects of oxygen using EPIFLO.

How EPIFLO Works

Convenience combined with wound healing for a better patient experience. Stay mobile, experience continuous treatment, and benefit from the safe, therapeutic effects of oxygen using EPIFLO.

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TCOT [transdermal continuous oxygen therapy] provides a cost-effective and portable option for oxygen therapy for chronic wound treatment.

STEP 1

Clean the wound area

STEP 2

Switch the device to “on”

STEP 3

Connect one end of the flexible oxygen tube (cannula) to EPIFLO, and place the other end above the wound area

STEP 4

Cover the cannula and wound site with recommended dressing

Watch the Video

About Transdermal Continuous Oxygen Therapy

Transdermal Continuous Oxygen Therapy (TCOT) provides a steady flow of oxygen to wounds 24 hours a day, seven days a week, until healed. Typically used to treat chronic and acute wounds, TCOT involves placing a thin tube (or “cannula”) above a clean wound bed. An absorbent dressing is placed over the cannula and wound site. The opposite end of the cannula is connected to an oxygen delivery unit which delivers a continuous flow of oxygen at a rate of about 3ml per hour.

Unlike hyperbaric or topical oxygen therapies that can involve 20-40 separate treatments in an outpatient setting, TCOT administers safe, effective treatment 24/7 wherever the patient may be.

Clinical research findings

Studies indicate that “TCOT [transdermal continuous oxygen therapy] provides a cost-effective and portable option for oxygen therapy for chronic wound treatment” and further suggest “that TCOT can increase healing and reduce time to complete closure,” particularly in older patients suffering from conditions like diabetic foot ulcers.

Overview: EPIFLO (TCOT) Study

Trial: TCOT Compared to Moist Wound Therapy

Pilot Study: TCOT for Chronic Wounds

Case studies

CASE STUDY

Diabetic Foot Ulcer + Osteomyelitis

CASE STUDY

Problematic Surgical Wound

CASE STUDY

Venous Leg Ulcer

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